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17
Nov
posted by - Thursday, 17 November 2011


Sony is constantly updating their F3 camera with new accessories, and we were able to get our hands on their new lens and recorder. The Sony 14-252mm lens (SCL-Z18X140) is designed specifically for the F3, and if you’ve been following our blog you probably already know a lot about it. This is the first powered zoom for a Super-35 camera and has a very interesting design. The lens attaches directly to the F3’s native mount, allowing for power and communication. The zoom lens offers auto focus (and push auto focus), auto iris and optical stabilization. The zoom motor is controlled by the F3 rocker, which I found to be very smooth. You’ll find controls for all of these features on the lens itself, in addition to a Flange Focal depth adjustment option, which can be activated by holding down a special button combination.

On the back of the camera, I connected the SR-R1 portable recorder. This is the first of Sony’s SR Memory recording options, which utilizes the high-quality SR Codecs found previously on HDCAM SR tape. This devices is perfect for anyone working in the SR world, and is basically a much less expensive and more portable version of the SRW1 deck. It records in 220Mbps, 440 Mpbs and 880 Mbps (coming in a future firmware) in either 422, 444 RGB or 3D (future firmware also). The compression format is what Sony calls Simple Studio Profile (SStP), which already has support in FCP and AVID. Learn more about SR-R1 with the F3 on Sony’s site here. An optional DPX Uncompressed recording option will come in the future. Downloading of the cards can be accomplished with the SR-PC4 or SR-PC5 data transfer units, which will be available early next year.

Watch my video above to learn more about both of these new products.

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